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Cardiovascular Effects of Olive Leaf Extract

Submitted by on April 13, 2011 – 7:12 am 2 Comments | 2,963 views

A just-published, double-blind, randomized, parallel and active-controlled clinical study showed that olive leaf extract could lower blood pressure in patients with stage-1 hypertension.

Study participants took olive leaf extract, 500 mg, twice per day for 8 weeks.  The average blood pressure at the start of the study was 149/94.  The average blood pressure at the end of the study was 137/89, a statistically significant improvement and very similar to the results achieved by an ACE inhibitor medication (which was also tested in the study).

Additionally, olive leaf extract also significantly lowered triglycerides, another important aspect that supports improved cardiovascular well being by taking extra fat blobs out of the circulation and thereby helping blood flow better.  In comparison, the ACE inhibitor did not lower triglycerides.  This information implies that olive leaf extract was improving metabolism as part of its method for lowering blood pressure, an important distinction between the often toxic mechanisms by which drugs change numbers.

Olive leaf extract is a potent anti-oxidant and well known as one of Mother Nature’s top immune support nutrients.  It is certainly building an array of science showing that it may also be a good choice as part of a metabolic support program.

Olive Leaf Extract and Blood Pressure  Phytomedicine.   Susalit E, Agus N, Effendi I, Tjandrawinata RR, Nofiarny D, Perrinjaquet-Moccetti T, Verbruggen M.


  • Jacks says:

    An interesting article. I was wondering if they also had a change in diet throughout the 8 weeks? I recently had a “thing” the lead me to believe that our food supply is so loaded with chemicals that herbal remedies have a hard time working.

    I don’t normally eat potato chips but I did recently and not only did my blood pressure shoot through the ceiling but so did my anxiety level. Plus, it lasted for 2 days before it was finally out of my system. It can’t be the amount of salt on the potato chips, can it?


  • Warren says:

    yes what do you think the results would have been if they also cut out refined foods, sugar and carbohydrates. Food does have a profound effect on our bodies.